Icons of Design

Icons of Design

Four innovators that helped shape the styles we love today. 


Fermob

 Photo via  Fermob . 

Photo via Fermob

In the 1920s, the Luxembourg low armchair first appeared along the pathways of the famous Parisian park from which it takes its name. Decades later, at the request of the Jardin du Luxembourg, it was reproduced by a workshop dedicated to traditional crafts called Fermob. Today the chair remains an icon of French style. 

 Photo by  Kris Atomic  on  Unsplash

Photo by Kris Atomic on Unsplash

 Photo by  Travis Grossen  on  Unsplash

Shop the Luxembourg Look


Dorothy Draper

Dorothy Draper's decorating changed history. Stylistically very anti-minimalist, she would use bright, exuberant colors and large prints that would encompass whole walls. She incorporated black and white tiles, rococo scrollwork, and baroque plasterwork—design elements now considered definitive of the Hollywood Regency style of interior decoration. (source)

Shop the Draper Look


Grace Coddington

 Grace Coddington, photographed by Sheila Metzner, Vogue, 1986

Grace Coddington, photographed by Sheila Metzner, Vogue, 1986

Grace Coddington is a Welsh former model and the Creative Director At Large of American Vogue magazine. Coddington is known for the creation of large, complex and dramatic photoshoots, and for producing some of fashion's most memorable imagery. 

Shop Coddington's Style


Harry Bertoia

Harry Bertoia was an Italian-born American artist, sound art sculptor, and modern furniture designer. In the early 1950s he designed five wire pieces that became known as the Bertoia Collection for Knoll. In Bertoia's own words, "If you look at these chairs, they are mainly made of air, like sculpture. Space passes right through them." Today the chairs remain icons of modern design. 

 Bertoia side chairs in the courtyard at the MoMA

Bertoia side chairs in the courtyard at the MoMA

Shop the Bertoia Look